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Main Dishes

salmon poke fertility foods

Fertility-Boosting Wild Salmon Poke Bowl

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The best way to get omega-3 is from fertility foods like raw wild salmon

 

As a matter of fact, high-end fish oil supplements are not the best way to get your omega-3. Omega-3 fats are chemically fragile:  their carbon double bonds are easily oxidized by exposure to heat, light and oxygen. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is an omega-3 fatty acid that is a primary component of the brain, cerebral cortex, skin, and retina. However, DHA’s molecular structure makes it one of the most vulnerable of all dietary fats.

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Hormone Balancing Chicken Veggie Bowl

Summer Spiralized Veggie Bowl with Shredded Chicken

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This light hormone balancing recipe is perfect for summer

 

This is a great recipe for balancing hormones, fertility, preconception, controlling hot flashes in menopause and recharging your adrenal glands. If you’re eating for your cycle, prepare this meal during the ovulatory phase. As a result, your body can thrive on less carbs and needs the fiber from the veggies to detox excess estrogen.

In addition, the ingredients in this recipe pack this bowl with key vitamins and provide blood sugar balance in a crunchy, tasty way. We recommend you purchase a spiralizer to make this recipe ASAP!

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Here’s why we love this recipe hormone balancing recipe

 

Blood Sugar Balance– this recipe has a great combination of protein from chicken, fat from the dressing, and fiber from the veggies. A balanced amount of carbs is supplied by the sweet potato. Ultimately if you consume too much sugar or not enough protein, the adrenal glands become stressed and insulin increases. This impairs the functions of other hormones such as estrogen, progesterone, and cortisol.

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Sweet Potato Quinoa Salad Bowl with Tahini Dressing

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This is a great recipe to prepare during the luteal phase of your cycle, if you are supporting your body in order to conceive, and for preventing PMS symptoms.

Here’s why:

Tahini is high in Vitamin B6 which has been shown in research to prevent PMS and support progesterone levels.
Quinoa is high in protein and fiber, which means it is great for blood sugar balance. This grain is high in magnesium which also prevents PMS symptoms. Read More

Miso Mushroom ‘Moon Stew’ For The Menstrual Phase

By | Blog, Broth, Soups and Stews, Eating For Your Cycle, Main Dishes, Recipes | No Comments

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This ‘Mushroom Miso Moon Stew’ for the Menstrual Phase is full of nutrient-dense and blood-building ingredients. I recommend that you eat mostly soups and stews when you are on your period because they are easy to digest, time saving (if you make them in advance) and a great delivery system for key nutrients. I love to call the stews you make on your period ‘Moon Stews’ and over the years I’ve formulated many recipes that I provide my clients and those who take my Eating For Your Cycle online course.

This one-bowl-meal is so great for the Menstrual Phase because of:

Miso is a fermented soy and rice paste.  During the Menstrual Phase your body has an increased tolerance for estrogens, such as the ones found in soy products, because your estrogen levels are so low. I don’t recommend soy during your Luteal Phase (the 10-14 days between ovulation and your period) because it can imbalance your estrogen and progesterone hormones and cause PMS.

Clams are high zinc, B12 and iron; all of which support blood-building and reproductive health.

Black Rice and Black Sesame Seeds support your kidneys and adrenal glands.

Nori seaweed has beneficial levels of calcium, iron and trace minerals.

Bone Broth has extra nutrient density and a delicious satiating flavor.

I hope you enjoy this recipe!

Miso Mushroom Moon Stew

Recipe by Sarah Steffens of Savor & Fancy

Ingredients

1 cup Black forbidden rice, prepared

2 Tbsp Roasted sesame oil

2 cups Cremini mushrooms, sliced

3 Green onions, minced, white and green parts separated

pinch Sea salt

pinch White pepper, OR Black pepper

1 tsp Garlic powder

4 cups Bone broth

2 Tbsp Miso paste

8 cups Baby kale

2 medium Zucchini, spiralized as ‘zoodles’

3, 3 oz. cans Shelled clams

Optional Garnishes

1 sheet Nori, cut into strips

4 tsp Black sesame seeds

 

Method

Prepare the black rice, set aside.

In a soup pot, heat the sesame oil over medium heat and saute the mushrooms, green onion, salt, pepper and garlic powder until mushrooms are softened.

In a separate bowl, mix the miso with 1 cup of broth to make a paste. Add the paste into the soup along with the remaining 3 cups of broth. Bring to a simmer.

Add the baby kale and reduce heat to low. Place the lid on top of the pot and once the kale is completely wilted, remove the pot from the heat.

Divide the ‘zoodles’ and black rice between 4 soup bowls or 4 mason jars.

Add one scoop of shelled clams to each serving, divide the soup between the servings and garnish with minced green onion, dried nori and black sesame seeds.

Lunch Bowl Series: Roasted Roots & Greens Bowl For The Luteal Phase

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Eating this lunch bowl during your luteal phase can help you reduce PMS symptoms and support conception.

The Luteal Phase lasts 10-14 days and starts right after ovulation. The follicle that the egg burst from grows on the surface of the ovary and starts to produce progesterone. The progesterone signals the body to keep the uterine lining intact. Estrogen and progesterone slowly decrease which signal the body to release the uterine lining.

It’s important to note that progesterone is the dominant hormone during this phase of your cycle. If estrogen gets too high or if progesterone is too low then it can cause PMS, breast tenderness, heavy period or other menstrual issues. PMS may be normal but it’s not natural. It’s actually a sign of estrogen dominance. If progesterone isn’t high enough it can decrease serotonin which can cause anxiety, depression and mood swings during your luteal phase. Eating specific foods during your luteal phase can help support your estrogen and progesterone balance.  

Here are the benefits of some of the ingredients  in this recipe:

Roasted Root Vegetables During the luteal phase, your body become more insulin sensitivity so it’s important not to spike your blood sugar with sugar and high carbohydrates. However, you do need some carbohydrates to support the seratonin in your brain. Roasted root vegetables such as carrots, squashes and parsnips are great options to have in your luteal phase because they provide you with a complex carbohydrate that will keep you satisfied but won’t spike your blood sugar.

Leafy Greens Eating your greens everyday is essential during your luteal phase because they contain calcium, magnesium, b vitamins, iron and fibre. All of these nutrients are important to support you in creating and processing proper hormone levels to reduce PMS and support conception.

Soft Boiled Eggs  One little known fact about hormones is that the building block for progesterone, estrogen and testosterone is cholesterol. Having a source of cholesterol, such as eggs, in your diet can help support optimal hormone levels. Eggs also give you B vitamins and choline which are important in processing and building your hormones.

 

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Lunch Bowl Series: Walnut Goji Shrimp Salad Bowl For The Ovulatory Phase

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This recipe is designed to support you during the ovulatory phase of your cycle when your estrogen levels are highest. You can tell you’re in this phase when your cervical mucous has an ‘egg white’ or watery texture.

It’s important that your body has the nutritional support necessary to remove the high amounts of estrogens you’re body is producing and the xenoestrogens you get from the enviroment out of your body during this phase. This will help reduce symptoms of estrogen dominance during your luteal phase such as sore breasts, bloating and mood swings.

Here’s why the ingredients in this recipe support you during your ovulatory phase:

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Lunch Bowl Series: Salmon Sushi Fertility Bowl

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This is a great recipe to make during the follicular and ovulatory phase of your cycle.  It’s packed with hormone balancing nutrients designed to help support ovulation, bring down inflammation and build blood lost from menstruation.

The follicular phase starts right after you stop bleeding and lasts approximately 7 days until you start noticing your fertile cervical mucous. Estrogen is rising and and the follicle stimulating hormone is being produced to stimulate the maturation of the ovarian follicle.

In this stage your body can really benefit from high omega three fats and antioxidant rich foods to give your body the fuel and nutrients necessary to develop and release the follicle.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Liver With Caramelized Onions

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Grassfed liver is in my top ten list of ‘Hormone Balancing Super Foods’. It’s high in important nutrients that support thyroid health, fertility, and adrenal health. If you want to consume more nutrient-dense foods in your diet then I recommend you eat liver once a week and if you’re just going to have it once a month, have it after your period to build up your blood.

Liver is high in fat-soluble vitamin A, D and K, zinc, iron, folate and all B vitamins including a high source of B12.

Many people struggle with the taste of liver. My best advice on liver is to smother it in caramelized onions, cook it on a high heat for only two minutes per side and if you don’t like the taste right away, the more you have it then the more you will develop an acquired taste for it. I didn’t like it at first but I felt such an energy boost after eating it that I started to crave it.

 

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Ingredients:

  • 1-2 Tbsp Virgin Palm Oil, Coconut Oil or Ghee
  • 1 small onion, chopped into half moon rings
  • 1 package of bison, beef or elk liver (around 300g), drained of liquid
  • Sweet smoked paprika, to sprinkle on top of liver
  • Salt and Pepper to taste

Instructions:

  1. Sauté onion rings in fat until caramelized. Remove and set aside.
  2. Pat liver dry with a paper towel. Sprinkled smoked paprika, salt and pepper on each side while cooking. Add some more cooking oil and sauté the liver on a hot heat for 2-3 minutes on each side until liver is cooked but pink in the middle. 
  3. Once cooked serve the liver topped with onion with a side salad or steamed greens and optional carb of choice.

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Photos  by Sarah Steffens of Savor & Fancy

sarahsteffensSarah Steffens is a Personal Chef based in Los Angeles.  She specializes in Paleo, Autoimmune, and Whole30 cooking and believes food is the starting ground for practicing kindness to one’s body, mind and spirit.  In addition to cooking for private clients, she also creates recipes and photography for Whole30.  She shares recipes and kitchen tips at Savor & Fancy.

Fall Chopped Salad

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This satisfying salad is a super portable ‘bring to work’ lunch recipe.  It has a balanced level of fats, protein and carbs to support optimal hormone and blood sugar balance. You can prep it up the night before in a mason jar but keep the salad dressing separate.

 

 

I’ve been super grateful to have Sarah Steffens creating and taking beautiful recipes for my blog this fall. She’s a private chef based in Los Angeles who also helps support women with emotional and binge eating. You can check out her blog here.

 

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FALL CHOPPED SALAD:

INGREDIENTS:

Serves 2

  • 6 ounces of cooked chicken thighs, diced and cooled
  • 2 slices of prosciutto, minced
  • 2 Tbs. of olive oil
  • ½ tsp. sea salt
  • Dash of white pepper
  • ½ tsp. dried thyme
  • ¼ tsp. garlic powder
  • 1 sprig of fresh rosemary
  • 1 Tbs. fresh lemon juice
  • 1 pear, thinly sliced
  • 1 head of romaine lettuce
  • ½ of a butternut squash, cubed and roasted
  • OPTIONAL: ¼ cup sprouted sunflower seeds

INSTRUCTIONS:

  1. Cook chicken thighs and roast butternut squash* and allow to completely cool. Dicein small bite size pieces. Toss chicken in olive oil, sea salt, white pepper, garlicpowder, dried thyme and lemon juice. Allow to marinate for about 15 minutes (orovernight).
  2. Chop romaine lettuce and add to a mixing bowl.Divide lettuce between 2 glass containers and top with marinated chicken, mincedprosciutto and sliced pear.
  3. Optional: Add ½ cup roasted butternut squash to each salad.*To cook chicken, place in a skillet with olive oil, sea salt and white pepper onmedium-low heat for 15 minutes. To roast butternut squash, peel, cube and placeon a baking tray lined with parchment paper with olive oil, sea salt and whitepepper and place in the oven at 400 degrees for 20 minutes.

Photos and Recipe by Sarah Steffens of Savor & Fancy

sarahsteffensSarah Steffens is a Personal Chef based in Los Angeles.  She specializes in Paleo, Autoimmune, and Whole30 cooking and believes food is the starting ground for practicing kindness to one’s body, mind and spirit.  In addition to cooking for private clients, she also creates recipes and photography for Whole30.  She shares recipes and kitchen tips at Savor & Fancy.