Category

Salad

salad to balance female hormones

Autumn Crunch Salad to Balance Female Hormones

By | Blog, Menstrual Health, Salad | No Comments

Are you eating enough salad to balance your female hormones?

 

Salads are often thought of as a healthy ‘diet’ meal that is a lower calorie alternative to other entrees. However, in order to achieve a healthy hormone balance between, say, estrogen and progesterone, you need to eat the correct amount of the correct foods.

If you choose a salad as an entree, it’s got to be packed with nutrition. You need to feed your body the building blocks to make progesterone.

This includes cholesterol, vitamin-A and thyroid hormone. Read More

Lunch Bowl Series: Roasted Roots & Greens Bowl For The Luteal Phase

By | Blog, Eating For Your Cycle, Main Dishes, Recipes, Salad | No Comments

Eating this lunch bowl during your luteal phase can help you reduce PMS symptoms and support conception.

The Luteal Phase lasts 10-14 days and starts right after ovulation. The follicle that the egg burst from grows on the surface of the ovary and starts to produce progesterone. The progesterone signals the body to keep the uterine lining intact. Estrogen and progesterone slowly decrease which signal the body to release the uterine lining.

It’s important to note that progesterone is the dominant hormone during this phase of your cycle. If estrogen gets too high or if progesterone is too low then it can cause PMS, breast tenderness, heavy period or other menstrual issues. PMS may be normal but it’s not natural. It’s actually a sign of estrogen dominance. If progesterone isn’t high enough it can decrease serotonin which can cause anxiety, depression and mood swings during your luteal phase. Eating specific foods during your luteal phase can help support your estrogen and progesterone balance.  

Here are the benefits of some of the ingredients  in this recipe:

Roasted Root Vegetables During the luteal phase, your body become more insulin sensitivity so it’s important not to spike your blood sugar with sugar and high carbohydrates. However, you do need some carbohydrates to support the seratonin in your brain. Roasted root vegetables such as carrots, squashes and parsnips are great options to have in your luteal phase because they provide you with a complex carbohydrate that will keep you satisfied but won’t spike your blood sugar.

Leafy Greens Eating your greens everyday is essential during your luteal phase because they contain calcium, magnesium, b vitamins, iron and fibre. All of these nutrients are important to support you in creating and processing proper hormone levels to reduce PMS and support conception.

Soft Boiled Eggs  One little known fact about hormones is that the building block for progesterone, estrogen and testosterone is cholesterol. Having a source of cholesterol, such as eggs, in your diet can help support optimal hormone levels. Eggs also give you B vitamins and choline which are important in processing and building your hormones.

 

Read More

Lunch Bowl Series: Walnut Goji Shrimp Salad Bowl For The Ovulatory Phase

By | Blog, Eating For Your Cycle, Main Dishes, Recipes, Salad | No Comments

This recipe is designed to support you during the ovulatory phase of your cycle when your estrogen levels are highest. You can tell you’re in this phase when your cervical mucous has an ‘egg white’ or watery texture.

It’s important that your body has the nutritional support necessary to remove the high amounts of estrogens you’re body is producing and the xenoestrogens you get from the enviroment out of your body during this phase. This will help reduce symptoms of estrogen dominance during your luteal phase such as sore breasts, bloating and mood swings.

Here’s why the ingredients in this recipe support you during your ovulatory phase:

Read More

Fall Chopped Salad

By | Blog, Main Dishes, Recipes, Salad | No Comments

This satisfying salad is a super portable ‘bring to work’ lunch recipe.  It has a balanced level of fats, protein and carbs to support optimal hormone and blood sugar balance. You can prep it up the night before in a mason jar but keep the salad dressing separate.

 

 

I’ve been super grateful to have Sarah Steffens creating and taking beautiful recipes for my blog this fall. She’s a private chef based in Los Angeles who also helps support women with emotional and binge eating. You can check out her blog here.

 

fall-chopped-salad-3

 

FALL CHOPPED SALAD:

INGREDIENTS:

Serves 2

  • 6 ounces of cooked chicken thighs, diced and cooled
  • 2 slices of prosciutto, minced
  • 2 Tbs. of olive oil
  • ½ tsp. sea salt
  • Dash of white pepper
  • ½ tsp. dried thyme
  • ¼ tsp. garlic powder
  • 1 sprig of fresh rosemary
  • 1 Tbs. fresh lemon juice
  • 1 pear, thinly sliced
  • 1 head of romaine lettuce
  • ½ of a butternut squash, cubed and roasted
  • OPTIONAL: ¼ cup sprouted sunflower seeds

INSTRUCTIONS:

  1. Cook chicken thighs and roast butternut squash* and allow to completely cool. Dicein small bite size pieces. Toss chicken in olive oil, sea salt, white pepper, garlicpowder, dried thyme and lemon juice. Allow to marinate for about 15 minutes (orovernight).
  2. Chop romaine lettuce and add to a mixing bowl.Divide lettuce between 2 glass containers and top with marinated chicken, mincedprosciutto and sliced pear.
  3. Optional: Add ½ cup roasted butternut squash to each salad.*To cook chicken, place in a skillet with olive oil, sea salt and white pepper onmedium-low heat for 15 minutes. To roast butternut squash, peel, cube and placeon a baking tray lined with parchment paper with olive oil, sea salt and whitepepper and place in the oven at 400 degrees for 20 minutes.

Photos and Recipe by Sarah Steffens of Savor & Fancy

sarahsteffensSarah Steffens is a Personal Chef based in Los Angeles.  She specializes in Paleo, Autoimmune, and Whole30 cooking and believes food is the starting ground for practicing kindness to one’s body, mind and spirit.  In addition to cooking for private clients, she also creates recipes and photography for Whole30.  She shares recipes and kitchen tips at Savor & Fancy.

Red Cabbage Chicken Salad Bowl With Walnuts & Fresh Mint

By | Eating For Your Cycle, Recipes, Salad | No Comments

RED CABBAGE CHICKEN SALAD BOWL WITH WALNUTS & FRESH MINT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This salad helps detox ‘bad’ estrogens from the bodies which may help reduce PMS and menopause symptoms. The walnuts provide liver supportive nutrients and omega three which help support healthy hormones. It’s also great to eat during the ovulatory phase of your cycle.

Serves 1

INGREDIENTS:

  • 4 ounces cooked Organic Chicken
  • 1-2 Tbs. Olive Oil
  • 1 Tbs. Lemon Juice
  • ¼ tsp. Sea Salt
  • Dash of White Pepper
  • 1 large Red Cabbage Leaf (2-3 Radicchio leaves will also work well)
  • 2 cups chopped Baby Spinach or Chard
  • ½ cup shredded Carrot
  • 1 Tbs. chopped and toasted Walnuts
  • 3 Fresh Mint leaves

INSTRUCTIONS:

Start by cooking your chicken (time saver: purchase a cooked organic rotisserie chicken from your local market) and once cooked, allow to cool in the fridge.

Toast chopped walnuts in a small frying pan on low heat, stirring frequently (about 3-5 minutes).  Let cool on a plate.  

Whisk together olive oil, lemon juice, sea salt and white pepper in a mixing bowl.

Add chopped baby spinach and shredded carrot to the mixing bowl and toss to combine with the olive oil mix.

Carefully tear a leaf off of the red cabbage and place in a portable storage container.  Scoop salad into the cabbage leaf and top with cooked chicken and chopped, toasted walnuts and additional sea salt and white pepper to taste.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR 

Sarah Steffens is a Personal Chef based in Los Angeles.  She specializes in Paleo, Autoimmune and Whole30 cooking and believes food is the starting ground for practicing kindness to one’s body, mind and spirit.  In addition to cooking for private clients, she also creates recipes and photography for Whole30.  She shares recipes and kitchen tips at Savor & Fancy.

 

Simple Sprout Salad with Mango & Soft Boiled Eggs

By | Eating For Your Cycle, Recipes, Salad | No Comments

SIMPLE SPROUT SALAD WITH MANGO & SOFT BOILED EGGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This salad is perfect for the ovulatory phase of the cycle or anytime during menopause for detoxing estrogen and providing the body with antioxidants. Pack it up as a light but nourishing lunch with a serving of healing bone broth soup!

Serves 1

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1-2 eggs, soft-boiled and allowed to completely cool
  • 1 Tbs. Avocado Oil
  • Juice from ½ Lemon
  • ¼ tsp. Sea Salt
  • 2 cups of fresh Chard, stems removed and chopped
  • 1 cup Pea or Sunflower Sprouts (micro greens are also a good choice)
  • ½ fresh Mango, peeled and julienned
  • 1 Tbs. Hemp Seeds

INSTRUCTIONS:

Begin by soft-boiling your eggs.  Bring a small saucepan (with lid) containing eggs to boil, remove lid, and boil for 3 minutes.  Remove from heat and allow to cool in the fridge.

Whisk avocado oil, lemon juice and sea salt in a small container and store sealed until ready to serve.

Toss chopped chard, pea or sunflower sprouts and mango in a mixing bowl.

Transfer salad to a portable container.

When ready to serve, toss with vinaigrette and add peeled, soft-boiled eggs and hemp seeds.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR 

Sarah Steffens is a Personal Chef based in Los Angeles.  She specializes in Paleo, Autoimmune and Whole30 cooking and believes food is the starting ground for practicing kindness to one’s body, mind and spirit.  In addition to cooking for private clients, she also creates recipes and photography for Whole30.  She shares recipes and kitchen tips at Savor & Fancy.

Asian Kelp Noodle Bowl

By | Eating For Your Cycle, Recipes, Salad | No Comments

IMG_5042

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kelp noodles are a gluten free noodle that supports healthy thyroid function by protecting your body from harmful radiation. The raw carrots in the recipe help detox ‘bad’ estrogen from the body which may help reduce PMS, menopause and perimenopause symptoms.

Serves 1

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 Tbs. Sesame Oil (light or toasted works fine)
  • 1 cup Kelp Noodles (Find at health food stores)
  • 2 Tbs. Coconut Aminos
  • 1 Carrot, shredded
  • 1 Baby Bok Choy, chopped
  • 1 Scallion, minced
  • 4 ounces of cooked Organic Chicken
  • Black Sesame Seeds to garnish
  • ¼ cup fresh Cilantro, chopped
  • Sea Salt & Pepper, to taste

INSTRUCTIONS:

Drain the kelp noodles from the solution and soak in cold water for 10-15 minutes. Strain and set aside.

Start by cooking your chicken (time saver: purchase a cooked organic rotisserie chicken from your local market) and once cooked, allow to cool in the fridge.

In a medium size sauce pan, bring heat to medium-low.  Add sesame oil, kelp noodles and coconut aminos and toss to combine.

Add chopped bok choy, shredded carrots and minced scallion.  Toss again so that everything is evenly distributed.  The veggies will wilt and marinate with the kelp noodles.  

Coconut aminos gives this dish a salty flavor, but you can add additional sea salt and pepper to taste.

Remove from the stove and store in a portable serving container.  Place cooked chicken on top of the noodles and garnish with black sesame seeds and chopped fresh cilantro.

Other ideas: Add diced avocado and fresh lime juice.

Enjoy!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR 

Sarah Steffens is a Personal Chef based in Los Angeles.  She specializes in Paleo, Autoimmune and Whole30 cooking and believes food is the starting ground for practicing kindness to one’s body, mind and spirit.  In addition to cooking for private clients, she also creates recipes and photography for Whole30.  She shares recipes and kitchen tips at Savor & Fancy.

Gut Healing Jicama Radish Slaw

By | Blog, Eating For Your Cycle, Recipes, Salad | One Comment

Coleslaw doesn’t have to be grated cabbage with store bought mayo! This slaw is packed with pre-biotic (which means food for your good bacteria) vegetables that are designed to help you build your gut health.

Raw carrots help remove excess estrogen from the small intestines.  Removing the ‘bad’ excess estrogen can help reduce PMS systems like bloating, breast tenderness and moodiness. It’s also important to remove excess estrogen to reduce common symptoms of perimenopause and menopause like brain fog, hot flashes and sleep issues.

Jicama, also known as Mexican turnip, can be purchased at most major supermarkets and ethnic markets. It tastes delicious raw; like a cross between an apple and potato!

Radish, with it’s spicy pungent flavor, helps naturally cleanse and detox the liver. Both radish and jicama are excellent sources of prebiotics, which means that they help feed the good bacteria in your intestines, important for healing the gut and promoting over all health in the body.

gut-healing-jicama-radish-slaw

Jicama, Carrot & Radish Slaw Recipe

  • 1 medium to large jicama, peeled and quartered
  • 2 large carrots, peeled
  • 1 bunch of red radishes (8-10)
  • Ginger Tahini Salad Dressing (recipe below)
  • Broccoli micro greens for garnish (optional)

In a salad bowl grate the jicama, carrot and radish. Stir in the salad dressing. This salad will make 6 servings and will store in the fridge for 5 days.

IMG_20160408_152530

Ginger Tahini Salad Dressing

  • 1 Tbsp. tahini
  • 1/3 cup olive oil
  • 1/4 cup raw apple cider vinegar
  • 1/2 tsp raw honey
  • 1/2 tsp dijon mustard
  • 1 tsp tamari soy sauce
  • 1 tsp natural fish sauce (optional)
  • 1 inch fresh ginger, peeled and chopped

In a high speed blender mix all the ingredients until the dressing is creamy.